UK Follows the Central Portal Trend In Global Transparency

07.17.14 | By Greg Hawley

Central Portal TrendAs reporting earlier by the Polaris Insights Blog, reports indicate that that trend towards central transparency portals may continue in the UK. In accordance with the EFPIA Disclosure Code, ABPI member companies must disclose information on most payments to British HCPs and HCOs, beginning on January 1, 2015 (with first publication due June 30, 2016). Under the EFPIA Code, member associations like ABPI may decide on the venue of disclosure and publication. So far, nearly all member associations are telling companies to publish on their own websites, the only exception being the Netherlands, which has a central portal which precedes the release of the EFPIA Code.

More importantly, it does not allow patients to pragmatically find out if their physician is receiving funds from manufacturers.

While ABPI is currently telling member companies to publish their disclosures on their own websites, reports suggest that ABPI will construct a central portal in the near future on which they will require companies to disclose.

In the same ways as it has or will do in the U.S., France, and the Netherlands, publication on a central portal will dramatically increase the impact and importance of spend disclosure. Disclosure on company website has historically only provided useable information to the most committed of researchers, such as ProPublica journalists. More importantly, it does not allow patients to pragmatically find out if their physician is receiving funds from manufacturers. A central portal would allow patients to do exactly that, and potentially make physician and treatment selections accordingly.

Details regarding the portal are unknown, but reports indicate that the system may include a tool for recording HCP disclosure consent. Ideally, this could greatly assist companies in understanding what payments are reportable

All of this would only serve to increase the scrutiny on the HCP/HCO spend. Furthermore, if the British portal proves to be successful, if may start a trend across major European countries, notably Germany, who are deciding how to present their EFPIA-required publications.